Data Trends for Investment Professionals

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Data Monetization: Compliance and Privacy

In our previous post, we completed our discussion of data productization, focusing on the importance of robust delivery systems and packaging. Next, we will discuss the data compliance and privacy concerns most often expressed by data providers. The media has made much of datasets used by Wall Street that are not “anonymized”, but the reality is that professional investors do not care one bit about an individual’s information. They only care about data that moves markets. That Lucy Morgan, 37, of Louisville, Kentucky just bought six family-sized bars of Hershey’s chocolate using her MasterCard at Costco does not interest them in...

Data Monetization: Delivering Your Data

As discussed in part one of our Data Monetization series, Building a Data Product, in order to sell data to finance professionals, your product must be clean and predictive. Data hygiene and predictiveness, however, are just one of many prerequisites on the path to productization. Though you are not expected to provide trading insights or make stock predictions, analysts and investors don’t want to have to corral your data. They want to be able to consume it easily without doing too much legwork. In this post we cover two key components to minimize data wrangling: How to properly package your...

Data Monetization: Building a Data Product

One thing we are often asked here at Quandl is how to go from raw data to a salable data product. We're the first to admit that the process of data monetization is complex and tedious, but ultimately worthwhile for your company. Whether you're a start-up or a publicly traded corporation, taking the time and upfront investment to transform your existing data into a market-ready product can pay handsome dividends in the long-run. Our specialty lies in developing data products and marketing them to a Wall Street audience. By this, we mean any institutional investor who is interested in consuming data to...

Quandl’s Guide to Monetizing Alternative Data

Many businesses from start-ups to multinational corporations have begun augmenting their revenue streams — sometimes exponentially — with their exhaust data. Professional investors who fail to beat their benchmarks quickly go extinct. They now need unique and untapped sources of data to remain competitive. While most think of selling data to brands, media companies and marketers, one critical potential audience for exhaust data is Wall Street. Investors will pay for exhaust or alternative data that tells them something unique about the economy in real time. If you are the owner of such a data asset and you’re contemplating its monetization,...

Data Monetization: 10 Pitfalls to Avoid

Here at Quandl we get a steady stream of inbound inquiries from companies keen to monetize their data assets to our audience of investment professionals. These data suppliers are not just peddling stock prices or futures or FX data. They are startups and companies born in an era of data ubiquity. They may have satellite data, smartphone or sensor data, logistics data, or business operations data. This is now known as “alternative data” in industry parlance. One belief unites them all: that their data holds value for capital markets. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Because in life, nothing is ever easy....

The (Weak) Link Between Alternative Data and Inside Information

The alternative data business is an art and a science—in that order. The science—in the form of statistics—kicks in once our quant team gets its hands on a new dataset. There is of course plenty of creativity and innovation in this process: instincts honed from years as quants on Wall Street play a big role in guiding the research process. But the work is grounded in scientific discipline. Before any data mining can begin at all, the mine itself has to be found. Finding data that can potentially yield alpha is very much an art. It involves a continuous conversation...

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